D.A.V Hindi School

D.A.V Hindi School

About D.A.V Hindi School


History of D.A.V

Dayanand Anglo-Vedic School or "D.A.V." in short, was named after the founder of the Arya Samaj Movement in India - Swami Dayanand Saraswati. A renowned Hindu reformist in the late 19th century, Dayanand was of the view that the most crucial factor in uplifting society was education. He organized schools to provide education for all, regardless of religion, caste or gender. This achievement may be taken for granted today, but at that time, and in the world he lived, the idea of educating "women" or "untouchables" was revolutionary, even radical. By the beginning of the 20th century DAV Hindi Schools could be found in many parts of the Punjab, Gujarat, Maharashtra and Uttar Pradesh. In the life of the individual the 50-year milestone is often seen as a marker of wisdom. So too in the history of an organization or a nation. Few non-governmental organizations are able to complete half a century.


History of Hindi

Hindi is considered to be a direct descendant of an early form of Sanskrit, through Sauraseni Prakrit and Śauraseni Apabhraṃśa. Hindi emerged as Apabhramsha (Sanskrit: अपभ्रंश; corruption or corrupted speech), a vernacular form of Prakrit, in the 7th century A.D.[30] Standard Hindi is based on the Khariboli dialect,[30] the vernacular of Delhi and the surrounding region, which came to replace earlier prestige dialects such as Awadhi, Maithili (sometimes regarded as separate from the Hindi dialect continuum) and Braj. Urdu – another form of Hindustani – acquired linguistic prestige in the later Mughal period (1800s), and underwent significant Persian influence. In the late 19th century, a movement to develop Hindi as a standardised form of Hindustani separate from Urdu took form. In 1881, Bihar accepted Hindi as its sole official language, replacing Urdu, and thus became the first state of India to adopt Hindi.[31] After independence, the government of India instituted the following conventions:[original research?] standardisation of grammar: In 1954, the Government of India set up a committee to prepare a grammar of Hindi; The committee's report was released in 1958 as A Basic Grammar of Modern Hindi. standardisation of the orthography, using the Devanagari script, by the Central Hindi Directorate of the Ministry of Education and Culture to bring about uniformity in writing, to improve the shape of some Devanagari characters, and introducing diacritics to express sounds from other languages. The Constituent Assembly adopted Hindi as an official language of India on 14 September 1949.[32] Now, it is celebrated as Hindi Day.